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cases rose by nearly 18% last year in Reno, , after a heavy layer of wildfire smoke settled over the city, according to findings from the Desert Research Institute.<br>Scientists believe there is a link to air pollution caused by the smoke between Aug.<br><br>16 and Oct. 10 and a rise in COVID-19 cases locally. <br>'Our results showed a substantial increase in the COVID-19 positivity rate in Reno during a time when we were affected by heavy wildfire smoke from  wildfires,' said Daniel Kiser, a co-lead author of the study published in the Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology. <br>'This is important to be aware of as we are already confronting heavy wildfire smoke...with COVID-19 cases again rising in Nevada and other parts of the western U.S.' <br>         Wild fires raged in Nevada in the summer and fall of 2020.<br><br>Smoke from the blazes, like the Pinehaven Fire, pictured above, were found to be linked to the rise of COVID-19 in Reno<br>         The flames destroyed thousands of acres and blackened the air with smoke<br>       Smoke rises from a neighborhood in southwest Reno  <br>There are currently more than 80 wildfires blazing in the west with [https://www.google.com/search?q=smoke%20clouds&btnI=lucky smoke clouds] and haze reaching New York City. <br>Kiser told the  that he hoped the research would motivate more people to get vaccinated and wear masks to reduce their exposure to the virus amid the latest wildfires. <br>Kiser and his team collected data from the Washoe County Health District and Renown Health, the region's largest hospital system, where they discovered wildfire particles that measured 2.5 micrometers - about one-thirtieth the size of a human hair - or less. <br>   RELATED ARTICLES              <br><br><br><br>Share this article<br>Share<br><br><br>Washoe County's 450,000 residents, many of whom live in Reno, experienced those particles for 43 days, the team said. The study compared the area with that of the San Francisco Bay, where people dealt with those particles for only 26 days. <br>"We had a unique situation here in Reno last year where we were exposed to wildfire smoke more often than many other areas, including the Bay Area," said Dr.<br><br>Gai Elhanan, co-lead author of the study and hvac books pdf ([https://things-to-do-auburn-al.Blogspot.com/ things-to-do-auburn-al.Blogspot.com]) an associate research scientist of computer science at the institute. "We are located in an intermountain valley that restricts the dispersion of pollutants and possibly increases the magnitude of exposure, which makes it even more important for us to understand smoke impacts on human health."<br> Kiser and Elhanan's team also cite a study out of Northern Italy where researches there found new coronavirus on these particles. <br>Kent Pinkerton, an expert on air pollution at the University of California, said there's concern among physicians and scientists about the impact of climate change on cardiopulmonary health, a topic he's currently addressing in an article he's submitting to a medical journal. <br>"Hotter temperatures, climate change, wildfires, air pollution, all seem to have some association with a greater risk of COVID-19 cases," Pinkerton said.<br><br>"If you're susceptible to air pollution, such as particulate matter, it could be that you just have a situation where you'll be also much more susceptible to viral particles that might be in the air that you're breathing.<br>Pinkerton added that there was a research in Turkey showing an upswing in COVID-19 cases that may be linked to air pollution.  <br>        The Reno Fire Department and the city worked together to vaccinate residents in April <br>They concluded that the wildfire particles were responsible for the rise in COVID-19 cases in the area. <br>While other research around the world points to similar conclusions, scientists have not yet found the mechanism that increases the risk. <br>Some have speculated that the virus attach to pollutants an get into people's lungs. <br>Kiser and Pinkerton said some researches theorized that because the pollutants make their way through the nasal, throat and lung passages, the inflammations they create along the way can make those areas ripe for infection.  <br>The U.S.<br><br>Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has its own about wildfire smoke and COVID-19 that that provides tips on how to prepare for wildfire season, including identifying high-efficiency air filters and maintaining a supply of N95 respirators which filter out particulates.<br><div class="art-ins mol-factbox news" data-version="2" id="mol-733840a0-edfc-11eb-b571-cbe79df36b74" website cases in Reno rose after smoke settled over the city in 2020
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's economy minister has accused Russian energy giant Gazprom of mounting an 'attack' on his nation after it slashed its supply of gas to Europe.<br>'The reduction of gas deliveries via the Nord Stream 1 pipeline is an attack on us, an economic attack on us,' Robert Habeck said in a speech to a German industry conference earlier today.<br>Gazprom said last week it would reduce supplies of the fuel to Germany via the pipeline due to delayed repairs, but the German government has called the decision 'political' amid the widespread European support for  following 's invasion.<br>As a result of the cut, Germany, Austria and the  decided to reactivate mothballed coal power plants to reduce their gas consumption.<br>Germany has also mandated the filling of gas reserves to 90 per cent ahead of the European winter, to hedge against a further reduction in supply.<br>'When we go into the winter with half full gas stores and the taps are turned off then we are talking about a difficult economic crisis in Germany,' Habeck said.<br>Currently, Germany's gas storage capacity is just under 60 percent full.<br>'We have seen this pattern multiple times now,' Habeck said at the conference.<br>Russian President Vladimir Putin has sought to 'create chaos' in European gas markets by cutting off supply to Poland and Bulgaria among other European countries, the minister said.<br>Habeck called for the 'diversification' of suppliers of raw materials and energy to achieve 'a bit of independence from the malign intentions of the world's dictators'.<br>Germany had a [http://www.techandtrends.com/?s=%27system%20rivalry%27 'system rivalry'] with Russia and China, the minister said.<br>China was a 'big market', Habeck said, but urged industry to use trade to promote 'our values'.<br>Accusations of a fuel attack on Europe come as Russia vowed to retaliate against Lithuania with measures that 'will have a serious negative impact on the Lithuanian population' after the country blocked EU-sanctioned goods from reaching the Russian exclave of Kaliningrad.<br>         Germany's economy minister has accused Russian energy giant Gazprom of mounting an 'attack' on his nation after it slashed its supply of gas to Europe.<br><br>'The reduction of gas deliveries via the Nord Stream 1 pipeline is an attack on us, an economic attack on us,' Robert Habeck said in a speech to a German industry conference earlier today<br>         Russian President Vladimir Putin (pictured) has sought to 'create chaos' in European gas markets by cutting off supply to Poland and Bulgaria among other European countries, the minister said<br>         The logo of 'Gazprom Germania' is pictured at the company's headquarters in Berlin, April 6, 2022<br>         Pipes at the landfall facilities of the 'Nord Stream 1' gas pipeline are pictured in Lubmin, Germany, March 8, 2022 <br>         Lt-Gen Evgeny Buzhinsky told Russian state TV that the West is playing with fire after deliveries of coal, metals, construction materials and advanced technology were stopped from entering the Russian territory via NATO state Lithuania<br>           Vladimir Putin 's allies have threatened Lithuania after the NATO country blocked EU-sanctioned goods from reaching the Russian exclave of Kaliningrad<br>         Russia's Security Council Secretary Nikolai Patrushev said Moscow will respond shortly to Lithuania's move to block deliveries of coal, metals, construction materials and advanced technology from mainland Russia to Kaliningrad<br>Russia's Security Council Secretary Nikolai Patrushev said Moscow will respond shortly to Lithuania's move to block deliveries of coal, metals, construction materials and advanced technology from mainland Russia to Kaliningrad.<br>'Russia will certainly respond to such hostile actions.<br><br>If you liked this information and you would like to get more details relating to [https://japbattery.com/rekomendasi-aki-motor-vixion/ Japan Auto Parts] kindly see our page. Relevant measures are being worked out in the interdepartmental format and will be taken in the near future,' Interfax cited Patrushev, a former KGB spy, as saying.<br>'Their consequences will have a serious negative impact on the population of Lithuania,' he added. <br>Patrushev's warning comes as retired Russian general Evgeny Buzhinsky urged Putin to send nuclear weapons to Kaliningrad. <br>The President's spokesman also weighed in, warning Moscow will never trust the West again following the move. <br>   RELATED ARTICLES              <br><br><br><br>Share this article<br>Share<br><br><br><div class="art-ins mol-factbox floatRHS news" data-version="2" id="mol-64bd8fc0-f15d-11ec-8ac4-7fce3cd3ee46" website minister says Putin is &apos;creating chaos&apos; by curbing gas supplies

Revision as of 05:49, 24 June 2022

's economy minister has accused Russian energy giant Gazprom of mounting an 'attack' on his nation after it slashed its supply of gas to Europe.
'The reduction of gas deliveries via the Nord Stream 1 pipeline is an attack on us, an economic attack on us,' Robert Habeck said in a speech to a German industry conference earlier today.
Gazprom said last week it would reduce supplies of the fuel to Germany via the pipeline due to delayed repairs, but the German government has called the decision 'political' amid the widespread European support for following 's invasion.
As a result of the cut, Germany, Austria and the decided to reactivate mothballed coal power plants to reduce their gas consumption.
Germany has also mandated the filling of gas reserves to 90 per cent ahead of the European winter, to hedge against a further reduction in supply.
'When we go into the winter with half full gas stores and the taps are turned off then we are talking about a difficult economic crisis in Germany,' Habeck said.
Currently, Germany's gas storage capacity is just under 60 percent full.
'We have seen this pattern multiple times now,' Habeck said at the conference.
Russian President Vladimir Putin has sought to 'create chaos' in European gas markets by cutting off supply to Poland and Bulgaria among other European countries, the minister said.
Habeck called for the 'diversification' of suppliers of raw materials and energy to achieve 'a bit of independence from the malign intentions of the world's dictators'.
Germany had a 'system rivalry' with Russia and China, the minister said.
China was a 'big market', Habeck said, but urged industry to use trade to promote 'our values'.
Accusations of a fuel attack on Europe come as Russia vowed to retaliate against Lithuania with measures that 'will have a serious negative impact on the Lithuanian population' after the country blocked EU-sanctioned goods from reaching the Russian exclave of Kaliningrad.
Germany's economy minister has accused Russian energy giant Gazprom of mounting an 'attack' on his nation after it slashed its supply of gas to Europe.

'The reduction of gas deliveries via the Nord Stream 1 pipeline is an attack on us, an economic attack on us,' Robert Habeck said in a speech to a German industry conference earlier today
Russian President Vladimir Putin (pictured) has sought to 'create chaos' in European gas markets by cutting off supply to Poland and Bulgaria among other European countries, the minister said
The logo of 'Gazprom Germania' is pictured at the company's headquarters in Berlin, April 6, 2022
Pipes at the landfall facilities of the 'Nord Stream 1' gas pipeline are pictured in Lubmin, Germany, March 8, 2022 
Lt-Gen Evgeny Buzhinsky told Russian state TV that the West is playing with fire after deliveries of coal, metals, construction materials and advanced technology were stopped from entering the Russian territory via NATO state Lithuania
Vladimir Putin 's allies have threatened Lithuania after the NATO country blocked EU-sanctioned goods from reaching the Russian exclave of Kaliningrad
Russia's Security Council Secretary Nikolai Patrushev said Moscow will respond shortly to Lithuania's move to block deliveries of coal, metals, construction materials and advanced technology from mainland Russia to Kaliningrad
Russia's Security Council Secretary Nikolai Patrushev said Moscow will respond shortly to Lithuania's move to block deliveries of coal, metals, construction materials and advanced technology from mainland Russia to Kaliningrad.
'Russia will certainly respond to such hostile actions.

If you liked this information and you would like to get more details relating to Japan Auto Parts kindly see our page. Relevant measures are being worked out in the interdepartmental format and will be taken in the near future,' Interfax cited Patrushev, a former KGB spy, as saying.
'Their consequences will have a serious negative impact on the population of Lithuania,' he added. 
Patrushev's warning comes as retired Russian general Evgeny Buzhinsky urged Putin to send nuclear weapons to Kaliningrad. 
The President's spokesman also weighed in, warning Moscow will never trust the West again following the move. 
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<div class="art-ins mol-factbox floatRHS news" data-version="2" id="mol-64bd8fc0-f15d-11ec-8ac4-7fce3cd3ee46" website minister says Putin is 'creating chaos' by curbing gas supplies